Latest Entries
Alcohol, Can Thou Be Our Good?
LONG MOUTH PUBLICATIONS @ KASS WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

Alcohol, Can Thou Be Our Good?

By Immanuel Lokwei, Such would have been the lived philosophy of my old comrades and schoolmates within Kapseret and the surrounding Kabongo area had alcohol not taken a heavy toll on their physiques and debilitated their capacities to do work to the fullest extent of their potentials. There is this famous inn, much like a … Continue reading

Beggars In Nairobi
LONG MOUTH PUBLICATIONS @ KASS WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

Beggars In Nairobi

By Immanuel Lokwei, Very few people, myself excluded, do set aside a portion of their monthly budget for beggars. I believe I don’t need any statistical backing to emphasize that given the high numbers of “masufferers” out everywhere, to whom the travails of budget planning only exist in their realm of imaginations, the percentage of … Continue reading

Striking On Behalf Of Medical Workers: A Sign of The “End of History?”
LONG MOUTH PUBLICATIONS @ KASS WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

Striking On Behalf Of Medical Workers: A Sign of The “End of History?”

By Immanuel Lokwei, Last year in February, Israeli union workers, employed on full-time bases, went on strike on behalf of their fellow subcontracted workers. These subcontracted workers’ woes echo current Kenyan medical workers’ grievances which pertain demands for wages increment, July salaries disbursement and better medical facilities. But unlike the Israeli subcontracted workers, our medical … Continue reading

KASS NIGHT: A MUSICAL CRITIQUE OF A GOOD NIGHT
LONG MOUTH PUBLICATIONS @ KASS WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

KASS NIGHT: A MUSICAL CRITIQUE OF A GOOD NIGHT

By Immanuel Lokwei, A huge majority would regard, and you could easily extract this consensus from them, that KASS night event that happened last Saturday night at Carnivore grounds is a night to be remembered. But there are a few people or at least one individual here who would be excluded by this generality. Of … Continue reading

THE FIRST TALK: THE ECONOMY OF MOB JUSTICE, LYNCHING
Philosophy and Literature / The Forum

THE FIRST TALK: THE ECONOMY OF MOB JUSTICE, LYNCHING

By Immanuel Lokwei, A peculiar thing I’m noticing about most of my fellow countrymen (and women if you’re a gender-sensitive reader) is the way they express their non-domestic complaints; they complain enthusiastically. You could easily dispel this observation by pointing out that this quality is commonplace among many nationalities across the globe and therefore the … Continue reading

The Forum

How Kenya’s ethnic conflicts get politicised – Al Jazeera Blogs

“Kibuso is a ghost village. You can almost feel the spirits swirl around in the little eddies of dust and ash that the wind kicks up in the oppressive afternoon heat.” How Kenya’s ethnic conflicts get politicised – Al Jazeera Blogs. “But this is a complex story with its roots buried deep in a mess … Continue reading

The Second Morning After Kenya’s March 4th
Philosophy and Literature / The Forum

The Second Morning After Kenya’s March 4th

By Immanuel Lokwei, GENRE: Futuristic, Fiction Some people have heard of the Tyranny of Numbers and have rebuffed it and have killed the messenger. Personally, I shy away from such actions for I am a messenger myself. Statistics don’t rub well with you unless they are favorable. Well, I will tell you what you cannot … Continue reading

Philosophy and Literature

My New Kingdom Is In You: Exploits in New York

By Immanuel Lokwei, GENRE: Solipsistic, Fiction (From Anecdotes of An “Ethnic Warrior” Who Never Was!) There have always been people on both the giving and receiving ends of oppression. When I see some people on the latter end, I wonder whether it is not a double tragedy to waste their misfortunes, to fail to make … Continue reading

Mutahi Ngunyi: My Argument in Support of Ethnic Suicide
The Forum

Mutahi Ngunyi: My Argument in Support of Ethnic Suicide

(Posted on October 25, 2009 – from http://mutahi-ngunyi.blogspot.com) Last week my readers corrected me. They told me that the ‘‘ahoi’’ are not only in Gema. You find them in every community. And I agree. In the tribe, the ‘‘ahoi’’ are subjects, not citizens. When their masters ask them to jump, they do not ask why. … Continue reading